Italian Contemporary Film Festival 2013: The Lost World Cup (2011)

Posted by Jeremy Prober June 28, 2013 0 Comment 6869 views

Question: Does one have to be a fan of soccer to be able to enjoy a story about soccer in the 1940s? Not necessarily. If a filmmaker is adept at telling a story in an interesting way, which I assert has been done in this case, then even if one has zero interest in the sport, one will find The Lost World Cup (Il mundial dimenticato) to be of interest.  Through a combination of interviews, audio clips, re-enactments and stock footage, co-directors Lorenzo Garzella and Filippo Macelloni have crafted a masterful docu-drama that follows the events surrounding the 1942 lost world cup of soccer (due to the war, this event was not actually officially sanctioned by the sport’s governing body FIFA).

Accompanied by a rather whimsical sounding soundtrack, The Lost World Cup  focuses on the key players that were instrumental in organizing this event. There was Count Otz, a wealthy eccentric aristocrat who happened to be the Minister of Sport for the Patagonian region at the time. There was the young blonde haired, blue eyed German Jewish photographer Helene Otz, who acted as a muse for the man who was instrumental in capturing the footage in 1942. And there were of course the players, derived largely from European countries. Only a few professional football players took part. For the most part, participants consisted of journeymen blue collar workers such as construction workers, miners, and fishermen. A team comprised of a unique cast of characters from the local Mapuche Indians was also fielded.

How does The Lost World Cup end? Well, I won’t give that away, only to say that there is a surprise ending, which should keep the viewer glued to their seat right to the very end.

Screening Times for The Lost World Cup

Monday, July 1 4:30 pm
TIFF Bell LightBox Cinema 2

A Gallery of Images from The Lost World Cup

Watch The Lost World Cup Trailer

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